Aston-Martin Lagonda redux

As a kid growing up in the 80’s the Aston-Martin Lagonda was an exotic curiosity. Outrageous edges, disjointed proportions, and a space-age interior..it was like a strange vision of the future, a future that involved digital instruments.

aston_martin_lagonda_series_2

Which seemed perfectly reasonable in an age of Austin Maestros with speech synthesisers.

Fast forward to now and Aston-Martin have launched the new Lagonda, called Taraff strangely enough. An interesting approach; they’ve decided to pay homage to the original cars’ silhouette, but with a far more refined, developed design language.

Aston_Martin-Lagonda_Taraf_2015_800x600_wallpaper_01

And there are some stunning and imposing views.

Aston_Martin-Lagonda_Taraf_2015_800x600_wallpaper_03

The grille blending into the headlights is incredibly well-resolved. The car hides its length well, as this is a 5.3m long car, with some neat touches. The front and rear fascia panels are slim, as on the original car.

Screen Shot 2015-03-01 at 19.14.14 copy

The front wheel arch is pulled tight over the wheel, skimming lbs off the visual weight…

Aston_Martin-Lagonda_Taraf_2015_800x600_wallpaper_02

And there’s a trick C-pillar crease that is really showing-off the fact that the panels are carbon-fibre – something almost impossible to do using conventional steel and stamping techniques.

So although it’s a car that clearly tips its hat to it’s ancestor it looks perfectly contemporary. Where it’s perhaps let down is inside. It’s a shame that Aston played it safe in here, bearing in mind the original Lagonda’s madness, but then perhaps they learned a lesson from the older car. The real missed opportunity though is that AM didn’t create a new minimal architecture for the interior. It’s essentially the same IP and console that’s in every other Aston-Martin of the last 5 years…

lagonda_06

…a slim Instrument panel, minimal analog interface, perhaps a beautiful steering wheel and gearshift could have really made the Lagonda the ultimate bespoke sporting limo. It’s clear that even with an incredibly high-end product like this there are cost-constraints, shared components. But I just wish Aston Martin had at least tried to reference the crazy innovation of the original interior.

Picture 6

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s